The Case for Contouring

by amandamcdougall

It was a trend that swept through the beauty world, leaving no survivors in its path. Professionals and newbies alike began to add new sculpting products to their arsenal in the hopes of beautifully chiseled cheekbones and a slimmer appearance. Sounds like a dream right?

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Now comes the waves of backlash from celebrities and professional artists, citing the merits of natural beauty. And this is precisely the reason I wanted to write about this. To have an argument from the side of someone without flawless cheekbones.

All things considered, I see where they are coming from. There is a major emphasis on women looking smaller and more model-esque, and this only contributes to the standards. So thats great! If there is less emphasis on the stars cheekbones, the better for women everywhere. However, these women often are famous for, or have generously been gifted with excellent bone structure… But what about the rest of us?

While my jawline is not as chiseled, if I can fake it in only a few short minutes, why wouldn’t I try? To me, it isn’t even a “looks” thing. Having my face done up and sculpted gives me an extra swing in my step and the confidence to brace days where otherwise I’d be in a slump. It does something to my demeanour, it lifts me up both physically and mentally. Now, it isn’t something I would recommend for everyday. In fact, I highly advise stepping out every so often with a completely bare face, just to remind yourself that the world won’t stop turning if you do. But on those days where the world is beating you down, or you have a presentation or whatever, why not put your best face forward with cheekbones so sharp you could kill? Im a fan.

My Pick: Anastasia Beverly Hills Contour Cream Kit ($52 CAD at Sephora)

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Sephora Pro Angled Contour Brush #75 ($37 CAD at Sephora)

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BeautyBlender Sponge ($28 CAD at Sephora)

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